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Richard Hammond's Invisible Worlds

TV ONE

About Richard Hammond's Invisible Worlds


This series is currently off air

About the show

Just beyond our naked eyes lies an invisible world of secret forces that touches every aspect of life on Earth and shapes it in unseen ways.

Now, for the first time, this hidden world is revealed in action.

The human eye is a remarkable piece of precision engineering, but all around us is an astonishing and beautiful world we cannot see.

Some wonders are outside the visible spectrum; others are too fast, too slow, too small or too remote for our eyes and brains to interpret.

From lightning sprites and shockwaves to heater bees and the crystalline structure of a spiders web, Invisible Worlds uses cutting-edge camera technology some specially adapted for this series to reveal the full glory of these secret forces and hidden powers.

Combining bold ideas with lucid scientific insights and stunning footage, Invisible Worlds is packed with surprising facts as well as phenomena never seen before on TV.

Transported into the heart of the action, viewers are immersed in a breathtaking journey of discovery.

The human eye takes about 50 milliseconds to blink, but it takes our brain around 150 milliseconds to process what we see.

The latest advances in imaging technology enable time to be effectively stretched, revealing the extraordinary things occurring during those missing milliseconds.

Did you know that air can shatter rock, water can tear through metal, lightning can strike upwards, and that the fastest life on Earth are microscopic fungal spores?

We know about the existence of ultraviolet, infrared, gamma rays, etc; we just cannot see them.

Voyaging to the very edge of the known electro-magnetic spectrum and beyond, Invisible Worlds reveals the world, quite literally, in a whole new light.

See the deadly discharge leaking from high-voltage power lines as repairmen risk their lives to fix it, the intense heat and energy of a forest fire, the hidden patterns and colours of a flower garden
as an insect sees them, how German scientists have  unlocked the secrets of animal movement, and a black hole at the centre of our universe.


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