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Episodes 81-85


Episode 81
Stories Sewn in Quilts

From Tales from Te Papa: Pacific Cultures episodes
Curriculum connections: English: Listening, Reading, and Viewing
The Arts: Understanding the Arts in Context
Social Sciences: Identity, Culture, and Organisation
Suggested curriculum levels: 2-6


Questions for students:

1. Explain how the distinctive tivaevae of the Cook Islands came about. What features of tivaevae make it different from other 'patchwork' styles?

2. Research the distinctive stitched works of other cultures, for example, American patchwork quilts, mola sewing of Panama and appliqué of the Hmong people of Thailand. Identify two or three key questions about the purpose, origin and style of those works. Use the 'Key questions' response template to record your questions and the information sources you've used. Make notes from each source that will help you write about the comparisons you've made.

3. When does an item with a practical, domestic use become an art work? What factors, if any, distinguish art works from everyday items?

4. A single tivaevae will often be made by a group of women. What would be the benefits and disadvantages of working together on a project like this? Have you ever collaborated to make a work? Discuss this concept with others.

5. Two of the quilts shown in the Tale were commissioned works. What does this mean? What is the role of commissioning in keeping an art or craft form alive?

Related links 
Pacific Cultures Collection
Pacific Cultures Tales
Episode 48: Tuvalu Clothes - a Tale about the way missionaries influenced the sewing styles and forms of the Pacific
TVNZ 7 Learning Hub

Related templates
Key questions


Episode 82
A Soldier's Christmas

From Tales from Te Papa: History collection episodes
Curriculum connections: English: Listening, Reading, and Viewing
The Arts: Understanding the Arts in Context
Social Sciences: Continuity and Change
Suggested curriculum levels: 4-7


Questions for students:

1. Explain the story of the soldier Christmas cards in your own words. Why are they considered 'iconic'?

2. What was the role of a war artist? Does New Zealand still have an official war artist? How do we receive most images of war now?

3. Watch Episode 50: Von Tempsky . Compare von Tempsky's role as an active soldier/artist with that of Peter McIntyre. What aspects of their work were the same? What aspects were different?

4. The presenter comments on the amount of gear a soldier had to carry. Research what a modern-day soldier carries into battle. Does a modern soldier have an easier or harder load to carry than a soldier in World War II? Use the 'Then and now' response template to compare the changes to a soldier's equipment over time.

5. Artists can play important roles in world affairs. Think about an artist's perspective on local or world events. How might this differ from the perspective of a politician or news reporter? Do you think artists can influence events by giving a different perspective? 

Related links 
Peter McIntyre paintings
History Collection
History Tales
TVNZ 7 Learning Hub

Related templates
Then and now


Episode 83
A Chiefly Sword

From Tales from Te Papa: Taonga Maori episodes
Curriculum connections: English: Listening, Reading, and Viewing
Social Sciences: Identity, Culture, and Organisation
Suggested curriculum levels: 3-7


Questions for students:

1. In your own words, explain how Te Rauparaha obtained the sword. Why was it given to him?

2. Why do you think Te Rauparaha had the Otaki church, Rangiatea, built in the way he did? What did he want to achieve?

3. 'Read between the lines' to explain what you can infer from the challenge Te Rauparaha put to the Ngati Raukawa chief. What kind of relationship might the two chiefs have had?

4. Use your own knowledge or carry out research to write a brief biography of Te Rauparaha. How would you describe his role in the history of New Zealand?

5. What is an 'emblem'? Give an example of an emblem. Use the 'Words' response template to explore this and other words heard in this Tale. Words to consider could include 'legendary', 'charismatic', 'adversary' and 'survey'.

Related links 
Taonga Maori Collection
Taonga Maori Tales
TVNZ 7 Learning Hub

Related templates
Words


Episode 84
Carved in Skin

From Tales from Te Papa: Taonga Maori episodes
Curriculum connections: English: Listening, Reading, and Viewing
Social Sciences: Identity, Culture, and Organisation
The Arts: Understanding the Arts in Context
Suggested curriculum levels: 2-6


Questions for students:

1. What does the carved wooden mask represent? Why was it made?

2. List some of the information or stories that t? moko can tell about the wearer. In particular, use information from the Tale to explain the significance of carvings on the forehead and nose.

3. Mark Kopua says most of his carvings are 'progressive'. What does he mean by that?

4. What do you already know about ta moko, or about other forms of tattoo? Can they be regarded as an art form? Use the 'Connections and conclusions' response template to record the connections you can make. Write comments on any conclusions you can draw from these connections.

5. If you had information about your life so far recorded in a tattoo, not necessarily on your face, what details would you include? Create a design that represents your own 'life mask'.

Related links 
Taonga Maori Collection
Taonga Maori Tales
Episode 24: Ta Moko Panel
Episode 85: A Powerful Peacemaker - portrait of Tamati Waka Nene
TVNZ 7 Learning Hub

Related templates
Connections and conclusions


Episode 85
A Powerful Peacemaker

From Tales from Te Papa: Taonga Maori episodes
Curriculum connections: English: Listening, Reading, and Viewing
Social Sciences: Identity, Culture, and Organisation
Suggested curriculum levels: 2-7


Questions for students:

1. What is a taiaha? How is it used in fighting? What other important role can it have?

2. What is the one thing that the narrator says 'can bring war to a standstill'? What does she mean by, 'it needs no language'? How is this message usually communicated?

3. Do some further research into the battle that the Tale refers to, when warriors came to Wellington from other parts of the North Island. What tribes and chiefs were involved? What was the purpose of the battle? What was the outcome?

4. The taiaha in the Tale has a special place in New Zealand history. Explain why this is so. Reference the events and people that form the taiaha's history.

5. How are regional differences and power struggles resolved or expressed in New Zealand now? Use the 'Then and now' response template to compare the methods used in the past with those used now. Take into account modern systems of democratic government at national, regional and local levels, and the role of tribal authorities.

Related links 
Taonga Maori Collection
Taonga Maori Tales
TVNZ 7 Learning Hub

Related templates
Then and now


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