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Episodes 61-65


Episode 61
A Soldier's Doll

From Tales from Te Papa: History collection episodes
Curriculum connections:  English: Listening, Reading, and Viewing
Social Sciences: Continuity and Change
Suggested curriculum levels: 2-6


Questions for students:

1. Who made the doll? Who used it? What was it used for?

2. Where did the name ANZAC come from? What do you know about the key event associated with the name? How could you find out more?

3. Communication methods have changed a lot since World War I. Use the 'Then and now' response template to compare several aspects of communication. Consider speed, convenience, privacy and reliability.

4. The doll's maker replicated items a real soldier would wear. What are these items? Why do you think she did this?

5. Why might small dolls have been sold as fundraisers for the war? Is this a practice we continue today? How does it compare with recent examples of public fundraising when New Zealanders are involved in international events? 

Related links 
World War I Collection
History Collection
History Tales
TVNZ 7 Learning Hub

Related templates
Then and now


Episode 62
Musket - Flash in the Pan

From Tales from Te Papa: History collection episodes
Curriculum connections:  English: Listening, Reading, and Viewing
Social Sciences: Continuity and Change
Suggested curriculum levels: 4-8


Questions for students:

1. The narrator says, 'With the new firearms, Maori cut their teeth in the intertribal Musket Wars.' Explain the meaning of each part of that statement.

2. The presenter says that in the 1820s, hundreds of muskets were traded with Maori in return for goods such as flax. Describe the impact of these exchanges. Use at least one example to illustrate change in Maori ways of life - and death.

3. Make a flow chart to show the process of loading and firing a musket. What problems can you imagine a soldier would face when using these guns in the heat of battle? Explain the origin and meaning of the expression 'a flash in the pan'.

4. Ruapekapeka was a pa purpose-built for warfare with firearms. What features illustrate this? How does it compare with the design of earlier, pre-European pa? Use the 'Comparisons' response template to show features that were the same and those that were different. Comment on the thinking behind this change in design.

5. Trading in weapons, or arms dealing, remains a controversial topic today. Plan a debate with classmates using a proposition such as: 'That trading in weapons is no different from trading in any other commodity'.

Related links 
Traditional Maori weapons
History Collection
History Tales
TVNZ 7 Learning Hub

Related templates
Comparisons


Episode 63
Cox's Diary from the Front

From Tales from Te Papa: History collection episodes
Curriculum connections:  English: Listening, Reading, and Viewing
Social Sciences: Continuity and Change
Suggested curriculum levels: 4-8


Questions for students:

1. Why do people keep diaries? What double-purpose does the presenter think Cox's diary served?

2. Use the 'Words' response template to explore some of the words in this Tale. Find out about any variations of meaning over time. Words to explore could include 'commemorate', 'censorship', 'divulge', 'agreeable' and 'eternal'. 

3. Why are the remains of an unknown New Zealand soldier from World War I part of our National War Memorial? What symbolic value do they have?

4. Why do we commemorate a battle that ended in defeat for the New Zealand soldiers and their allies? Research this and discuss or record your own opinions about Gallipoli.

5. The narrator says that Cox returned to New Zealand, 'wounded and with plenty of stories to tell.' What were the main sources of knowledge about wars in the past? What are our main sources of knowledge about current wars?

Related links 
E P Cox's Gallipoli Diary
History Collection
History Tales
TVNZ 7 Learning Hub

Related templates
Words


Episode 64
Painter's Nightmare

From Tales from Te Papa: Art episodes
Curriculum connections:  English: Listening, Reading, and Viewing
The Arts: Understanding the Arts in Context
Suggested curriculum levels: 5-8


Questions for students:

1. What does 'conservation' mean in this context? What does a conservator do? Why do museums like Te Papa put so much effort into conservation work? Why don't museums just let art works age naturally?

2. List the specific problems with Colin McCahon's 'Northland Panels'. Describe how each problem can be solved. You may need to carry out further research.

3. How might the context in which art works are produced limit or influence the materials that artists use? Do you think some artists deliberately choose to use materials that will not last long? Why would they do that?

4. What lessons could artists take from this Tale about the choice of materials they use? When you are deciding what materials to use in an art work, do you think about how the art work will survive over time?

5. What other conservation processes did this Tale remind you of? Examples might include environmental conservation, plastic surgery, makeovers or house or clothing repairs. Use the 'Connections and conclusions' response template to record the connections that help you understand more about art conservation. What conclusions can you draw about the purpose and process of art conservation?

Related links 
'Northland Panels'
Art Collection
Art Tales
TVNZ 7 Learning Hub

Related templates
Connections and conclusions


Episode 65
Crayfish - Crazy Life Cycle

From Tales from Te Papa: Natural Environment episodes
Curriculum connections:  English: Listening, Reading, and Viewing
Science: Living World; Nature of Science
Suggested curriculum levels: 4-8




Questions for students:

1. The Tale uses some different names for crayfish. Find out the scientific name and add the Maori and common names. Do they all refer to the same species? What features show that something belongs to this species?

2. The first larval stage of crayfish is called phyllosoma; the post-larval stage that swims to shore is called puerulus. Use information from this Tale to make a flow chart of the life cycle of crayfish. For each stage, describe where it takes place and the risks to survival. Explain how crayfish meet those challenges. What is 'crazy' about this life cycle?

3. Compare the life cycle of crayfish to that of another species that undergoes metamorphosis, for example, an insect. How are they similar? How are they different? Use the 'Comparisons' response template to record facts and add a statement to summarise your comparison.

4. From what you've learnt about the crayfish life cycle, what human actions might interrupt that cycle? What precautions can humans take to minimise these risks?

5. Crayfish are a valuable export for New Zealand. How could scientific research about their life cycle contribute to our economy?

Related links 
Research into crustacea
Natural Environment Collection
Natural Environment Tales
TVNZ 7 Learning Hub

Related templates
Comparisons


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