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Episodes 36-40


Episode 36
Play School Toys

From Tales from Te Papa: History collection episodes
Curriculum connections: English: Listening, Reading, and Viewing
Social Sciences: Identity, Culture, and Organisation; Continuity and Change 
Suggested curriculum levels: 2-5


Questions for students:

1. What reason is given for Play School being such a popular children's show? When did it screen in New Zealand? How old would children from the original audience be now?

2. Why do you think that the Play School Toys are kept as museum pieces? Why do you think they are some of the most popular items in Te Papa's History collection? Does this surprise you?

3. How were the Play School characters made? How are the characters in many modern children's television shows made? What can makers of modern programmes do that could not be done in the 1970s? Compare three or more aspects that have changed over time. Use the 'Then and now' response template to record your ideas.

4. What toys or television characters from your childhood will you remember most when you're an adult? To what extent do you think young children are influenced by the television shows they watch? Is this a good or bad thing? Explain your reasons.

5. What connections did you make with your own childhood television watching? Did these connections help you to understand the Tale better? Why do you think this?

Related links 
History Collection
History Tales
TVNZ 7 Learning Hub

Related templates
Then and now


Episode 37
Phar Lap Skeleton

From Tales from Te Papa: History collection episodes
Curriculum connections: English: Listening, Reading, and Viewing
Social Sciences: Identity, Culture, and Organisation
Suggested curriculum levels: 3-6


Questions for students:

1. Phar Lap was 'half Kiwi, half Aussie'. Explain what that means. Based on what you saw and heard in the Tale, do you think he should be seen as a New Zealander or an Australian, or both? Why?

2. Why is Phar Lap so famous? Find the key ideas in the Tale that tell you what made him famous, and why he is still famous today.

3. Where are the other parts of Phar Lap? Do you think they should be in one place, and if so, where should they be? Why do you think that?

4. Why do you think Australians and New Zealanders argue over the nationality of Phar Lap and other famous people or items, for example, the pavlova, Split Enz or Russell Crowe? Relate this to concepts such as nationalism, national pride or identity. How important is it for a country to have recognisable 'icons'? Use the 'Connections and conclusions' response template to record your thinking.

5. Why does Te Papa have the skeleton of Phar Lap? What does this say about the importance of horse breeding and racing to New Zealanders?

Related links 
History Collection
History Tales
TVNZ 7 Learning Hub

Related templates
Connections and conclusions


Episode 38
Tapa Cloth

From Tales from Te Papa: Pacific Cultures episodes
Curriculum connections: English: Listening, Reading, and Viewing
Social Sciences: Identity, Culture, and Organisation
The Arts: Understanding the Arts in Context; Developing Practical Knowledge
Suggested curriculum levels: 3-6


Questions for students:

1. What does the presenter mean when she says tapa 'takes a lot of beating'? How is tapa used? What was the most interesting thing you learned about tapa from this Tale?

2. What processes are used to turn a piece of bark into tapa? Are the same processes used in all Pacific islands? If not, how are they different? How could you find out more? Use the 'Key questions' response template to record questions and information from this and other sources.

3. Why did Jakki Leota-Ete want her wedding dress to be made of tapa? What is your opinion of the tapa wedding dress? What other ideas do you have for using a material like tapa? What are its limitations as a fabric?

4. From what you already know about museums and their collections, why do you think Te Papa holds in trust the wedding dress and the older garment? What does 'rare' mean in this context?

5. Why do you think cotton has replaced tapa in Pacific islands? What other older, hand-made materials have been replaced by modern materials? Given some examples.

Related links 
Pacific Cultures Collection
Pacific Cultures Tales
TVNZ 7 Learning Hub

Related templates
Key questions


Episode 39
Vita Dress

From Tales from Te Papa: History collection episodes
Curriculum connections: English: Listening, Reading, and Viewing
The Arts: Understanding the Arts in Context
Suggested curriculum levels: 3-8


Questions for students:

1. What does the word 'fashion' mean to you? It's a word that has many connotations and collocations. Find out what these terms mean, then make two lists: one for the connotations of 'fashion', the other for some of the collocations of the word.

2. The presenter refers to a dressmaker's dummy as a canvas - he says Marilyn Sainty is a designer who makes art wearable. What distinctions do you think there are between art and fashion? Who decides which is which?

3. We learn that the decoration on the dress is made by another person. When two or more people contribute to a work, it's often called a collaboration. Research other examples of collaboration in any area of art. Comment on the contribution of each person involved.

4. What can fashion tell us about a time or a culture? Use the 'Then and now' response template to compare fashions now with those of another era. What changes over time, and what remains the same?

5. How does the Vita dress illustrate the point that 'fashion take its inspiration from the past'? Can you give other examples of this?

Related links 
Dresses
History Collection
History Tales
TVNZ 7 Learning Hub

Related templates
Then and now


Episode 40
Mary-Annette Hay

From Tales from Te Papa: History collection episodes
Curriculum connections: English: Listening, Reading, and Viewing
Social Sciences: Economic World
Suggested curriculum levels: 4-8


Questions for students:

1. Why was Mary-Annette Hay known as 'the Queen of Wool'? In what period of New Zealand history was she famous?

2. Identify some of the specialist vocabulary used in this Tale, including French terms. List them and explain their meanings in the context of the Tale.

3. What methods did Hay use to promote wool? Describe a modern campaign to promote a local product that we take for granted. What impact do you think the campaign has or will have on buying behaviour and therefore on the economy?

4. How significant do you think Hay's work with wool was for the New Zealand economy? Use the 'Key questions' response template to pose some questions about the place of wool in our economy. Find sources of information, including this Tale, and make notes to help you find answers to your questions.

5. Wool has gone in and out of fashion over time. Identify some of the more recent influencers in making wool fashionable. What garments do you wear that are made of wool?

Related links 
History Collection
History Tales
TVNZ 7 Learning Hub

Related templates
Key questions


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