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TVNZ 7

Episodes 115-120


Episode: 116
Title: A Whale Tooth Tale

Te Papa Collection: Pacific Cultures
Suggested curriculum levels: 2-6
Curriculum connections: English: Listening, Reading, and Viewing
Social Sciences: Identity, Culture, and Organisation

Description: All cultures have objects that are highly treasured. In many countries, some of these objects might be shown on coins or paper currency. In Fiji, the tooth of a whale is shown on the 20c coin. Find out why.

Questions for students
1. Describe the tabua. What is it? Where does it come from? Where would you be most likely to see one in Fiji?

2. How is the tabua used in ceremonial occasions? What do you think it signifies?

3. What makes the tabua so special, apart from the way it is used?

4. What objects are highly valued in your culture? Think about items that are given or exchanged on special occasions. Use the 'Connections and conclusions' response template to identify connections you can make to the tabua. What can you conclude about the objects used in your culture?

5. Susan Elliot says her connection to the tabua is as an artist. What ideas does the use of sperm whales' teeth give you for an art project?

Related links:
Pacific Cultures Collection

Related templates:
Connections and conclusions

Episode: 117
Title: More than Mere

Te Papa Collection: Taonga Maori
Suggested curriculum levels: 4-6
Curriculum connections: English: Listening, Reading, and Viewing
Social Sciences: Identity, Culture, and Organisation

Description: Mere were once weapons of war; now they may carry new stories of people and places that give them a different kind of strength. Piri Sciascia is the proud holder of three such mere.

Questions for students
1. What are mere made from? How does the shape of a mere make it well-suited to its original purpose?

2. Why was Piri not allowed to take the large mere onto a plane? Do you agree with the pilot or with Piri? Why?

3. Why are there very few old mere still in existence? What happened to them? Why?

4. Piri says its time to give mere a new history. What does he mean by that? Can you give an example of an old weapon having a new history?

5. Mere have a different significance and purpose nowadays. Identify two aspects of their value and use that have changed over time. Use the 'Then and now' response template to record these changes.

Related links:
Taonga Maori Collection

Related templates:
Then and now



Episode: 118
Title: World War I Letters from the Front

Te Papa Collection: History
Suggested curriculum levels:  4-7
Curriculum connections: English: Listening, Reading, and Viewing
Social Sciences: Continuity and Change

Description: Twelve thousand New Zealand soldiers died in World War I. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in remembering the soldiers who lost their lives so far from home. The mementoes of one soldier represent those who were not able to leave anything behind to tell of where, when and how they died.

Questions for students
1. Carry out research to find the places where New Zealand troops fought and died in World War I. What do you know about communication between New Zealand and those parts of the world in 1914-18?

2. Watch the video again and list the items that were in the small canvas bag sent to Herman Rolfe's mother. What personal items do you think a modern soldier would carry with him?

3. How did Rolfe's mother come to learn so much about her son's death?

4. What connections can you make with this Tale? Use the 'Connections and conclusions' response template to record your connections. What conclusions can you draw about the memories of soldiers killed in battle?

5. Mike Houlihan says there has been a huge increase in the number of people visiting war memorials and viewing soldiers' mementoes. Why do you think this is so?

Related links:
History Collection

Related templates:
Connections and conclusions

 
Episode: 119
Title: Music to Maori Ears

Te Papa Collection: Taonga Maori
Suggested curriculum levels: 2-6
Curriculum connections: English: Listening, Reading, and Viewing
The Arts: Communicating and Interpreting

Description: The humble case moth is said to have inspired the beautiful shape and sounds of a special taonga puoro, or Maori musical instrument. How can that be?

Questions for students
1. Why is the sound of the putorino said to be inspired by the case moth? Do you think this is a true story? Why do you think that?

2. Describe the sounds the putorino can make and how they are produced. What do the different sounds represent? Use the 'Comparisons' response template to compare the sounds of the putorino with another wind instrument, such as the flute or trumpet.

3. Shane says many putorino have lain dormant in museums for many years, until recently. What does he mean by this? Why are there no records of how putorino were made and used?

4. There has been a renewed interest in making and playing traditional Maori instruments. Why do you think people have taken a greater interest in recent years? Where can they learn more?

5. Most cultures have used musical instruments for centuries. Find out more about taonga puoro, or the traditional instruments of a different culture.

Related links:
Taonga Maori Collection

Related templates:
Comparisons

 
Episode: 120
Title: Kava Clubs and Black Fowls

Te Papa Collection: Pacific Cultures
Suggested curriculum levels: 4-6
Curriculum connections: English: Listening, Reading, and Viewing
Social Sciences: Identity, Culture, and Organisation

Description: 'Boy meets girl' happens all over the world, but in some cultures, a 'Black Fowl' or close friend is needed to move things along. In Tonga, the Black Fowl entertains the parents with a kava ceremony while the boy and girl have some time to get to know each other.

Questions for students
1. Why does Simon Morton start this Tale with a bunch of flowers? What point is he making?

2. Tevita Finau says the process he describes is for 'commoners' or ordinary people. He implies that high-status people had different ways of match-making. Why might that be?

3. How is kava made? Explain the process, using a series of labelled diagrams.

4. Kava is associated with many traditions and rituals. Today's kava clubs have kept some and changed others. What has stayed the same? What has changed? Why does Tevita Finau encourage young people to join a kava club?

5. Depending on the culture you are from, meeting a prospective partner now might be very different to the way your great-grandparents met. Use the 'Then and now' response template to compare two aspects of the social lives of young people that have changed over time.

Related links:
Pacific Cultures Collection

Related templates:
Then and now





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