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Jack Nicholson wants to be eaten by vultures

Published: 9:33PM Monday February 08, 2010 Source: BANG Showbiz

The Bucket List and Easy Rider star Jack Nicholson say he would like to be consumed by vultures when he dies.

The 72-year-old actor has become fascinated with the traditional sky burials carried out by some Native Americans which involve the deceased's body being hung from a tree or wooden scaffold and being left for scavengers.

He told German TV channel Tele 5: "I've had several ideas. Once I thought it would be nice to be buried under a large statue that is at least ten metres high. Then I liked the nature of the Indians who haul their bodies up into the trees so that they are eaten by the birds."

Although Nicholson is undecided about the fate of his remains, one thing he is certain about is he does not want to be laid to rest in a coffin.

He said: "I will probably end up in a crematorium as I'm too claustrophobic for a coffin."

Even though he's been thinking about his funeral, Nicholson insists he isn't scared of death and feels as though he has achieved everything he wanted to in his life.

The Oscar winner - who starred in The Bucket List with Morgan Freeman, about two terminally ill patients who escape from a cancer ward to fulfil their remaining life ambitions - said: "I remember a wonderful conversation I once had with my fellow actor John Gielgud. He said he had made a schedule with things he would like to do before he dies& travel the entire world, learn how to cook, but he found that nothing was as appealing as acting. I agreed with him."

Native Americans would have sky burials because they believe after death the souls of the dead lingered in the air and watched over the tribe until it was time for their soul to move on to the afterlife.

By raising the bodies up high the belief was the soul could exit its mortal constraints faster.